The Municipalist School was set up as with the aim of creating a space for self-training and knowledge exchange based on different experiences of municipalism throughout Europe. In the complex heterogeneity of its forms, the municipalist perspective attributes a crucial role to the direct and collective action of citizens in order to tackle some of the contemporary challenges that our cities are facing: housing speculation, socio-economic and gender inequalities, climate change, health protection, radical democracy, and much more. Thanks to the creativity and political innovation that these experiences have demonstrated in the past years, new possibilities and new tools are emerging to rethink urban space and transform the political horizon by focusing on social rights, wellbeing and the commons.

The programme consists of four online meetings of one and a half hours each, which will take place on Thursdays between 11 May and 4 June 2021 – always at 7pm CET Participation is free of charge. A simultaneous translation in different languages is foreseen – according to each meeting’s necessity. At the end of each session, the videos of the main contributions and a report of the meeting will be available online, with transcripts. To receive the information about the sessions, please register in the School through this form.

Can municipalism change the institutions?

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One of the common features of the Municipalist experiences all over Europe is disseminating political power among citizens at the local level. This goal implies, on the one hand, a different relationship between the citizen and the urban space, based on the re-appropriation of common goods. On the other, the development of new tools and methods of political participation, allowing a dialectic confrontation for policymaking. Can these practices lead to the creation of new institutions from below?

Between regenerative economies and local specificities: experiences, models, tools

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Faced with the exacerbation of socio-economic inequalities, new models of local and regenerative economies have developed in recent years in cities to meet growing social and environmental needs. Despite the different characteristics depending on the specific socio-economic nature of the territories, these models are genuine ecosystem alternatives to the dominant model of linear economy. What perspectives can we draw for these experiences over post-pandemic transitions?

Municipalism and climate change: which role for the cities within the ecological transition?

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The climate crisis has increasingly significant repercussions at the local level, in urban, peri-urban and rural areas. Air quality, water, energy, soil and food are becoming crucial public health issues. Several municipalist experiences have addressed these issues and suggested innovative approaches to public policy. This workshop will explore some of these experiences, focusing on potentially common issues and providing concrete solutions and tools.

Right to housing and municipalism: success stories

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The municipalist perspective maintains a close link with housing, public heritage and territorial issues, often arising from struggles against housing speculation. Although not all of these experiences have been successful in past years, they represent a significant body of knowledge to be shared and reflected upon. How could municipalist politics learn from past experiences and develop new strategies and practices about them?